Twenty Reasons to Major in Music


Letting Your Kid Major in Music – 10 Compelling Reasons
January 2, 2019 by Bill Zuckerman

Bill Zuckerman

Choosing to become a music major, or allowing your child to become a music major, does not need to be nearly as hard as you may think.


Don’t believe what the world says about not being able to make a living in music.

Here’s the real truth; not only is it very possible to make a living in music, but you also have the option to choose to do something else with your life after being a music major too.

Plenty of music majors go onto successful careers in the arts, and plenty of others use the skills they learn in college for other careers they fall in love with.

I have a message for parents and for students…

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Ten Reasons To Let Your Kid Major In Music

June 4, 2017 by Liz Ryan

Liz Ryan

Dear Liz,

My daughter is a junior in high school, and she is sure that she wants to major in music in college.

She wants to attend a music conservatory. That plan scares my husband and I greatly.

We love the fact that our daughter is a talented musician, but how can we in good conscience tell her "Sure, get a degree in music performance."? What could she possibly do with that degree?

How many people earn their living playing the cello?

My recommendation is for her to get a more conventional degree but to minor in music.

My husband wants her to study engineering or math (she is gifted in both math and science) and keep her musical activities out of her academic program entirely.

He says she can play in an ensemble as an extra-curricular activity.[…] what's your opinion?

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College Music Majors are the most likely group of graduates to be admitted to medical school. 66% of musicians get accepted - the highest percentage of any college major.
L. Thomas

"The true purpose of arts education in not necessarily to create more professional dancers or artists.  It's to create more complete human beings who are critical thinkers, who have curious minds, who can lead productive lives."  

Kelly Pollock, Executive Director
Center of Creative Arts, St. Louis